For neutering vouchers contact:

Cats Protection Tel: 03000 121212 

or 

RSPCA Tel: 01924 299170 or 

email info@rspcaleedsandwakefield.org.uk

 

Reports of cats having kittens in gardens, yards and streets, or male cats fighting and chasing unneutered females are increasing. 

It is a complete myth that a female cat should be allowed to have one litter of kittens.  There is no biological or psychological benefit to the cat whatsoever.  If you allow your female cat to have a litter and manage to find homes for the kittens, they have then used up homes that kittens sitting in a rescue centre could have had which may then end up being destroyed. Many female cats come into season, get chased far from their home by unneutered males and end up completely lost, pregnant and living on the streets.  This is how feral cat colonies are formed.  They struggle to survive, often hungry and frequently becoming sick or injured.

Many unneutered males wander away from home to find a female, crossing busy roads where they are often killed, and fighting other unneutered males. Unneutered males can carry the FIV virus (feline Aids) which can be passed onto both males and females through biting during fights.  This can then be passed onto the unborn kittens.  During mating the male grabs the back of the female's neck with his teeth often causing a wound, and after mating briefly the female, who can be frightened and in pain, can turn round and lash out at the male causing further injury.  It is an unpleasant existence for both male and female cats.

Cats should be neutered at 5 months but can be neutered from 3 months if the kitten is in good health.  You will need to be guided by your vet.  To prevent unwanted litters your kitten should be kept indoors until it is neutered.  Even if your cat is to be kept as an "indoor" cat it is kinder to neuter as a female will constantly come into season which is very frustrating for her and you. Unneutered females are also more at risk of developing cystic ovaries and the potentially fatal pyometra.  A male cat kept indoors will eventually begin to spray strong smelling urine around the house which is a natural scenting process when fully mature. 

How does this help feral cats?

By encouraging owners to have their cats neutered it will reduce the number of tame cats having kittens that may then be abandoned or are born outdoors and which could then grow up to be feral.  Neutering domestic cats tackles the stray and feral cat problem at the source.

Who to contact

Being a small group, our funds are limited.  However, half price vouchers can be obtained from Cats Protection, RSPCA or PDSA.  We may be able to transport cats to and from the vets if owners live in Leeds and find this difficult to do.  We do ask owners to take some responsibility for their own cats and make a contribution towards the neutering cost or even towards the petrol used by the volunteer collecting and returning your cat. 

Half price neutering vouchers 

Half price neutering vouchers are available for cat owners who are on means tested benefits or low income and can be obtained from or feral colony grants:

 Cats Protection Tel: 03000 121212 

or 

RSPCA Tel: 01924 299170 or 

email info@rspcaleedsandwakefield.org.uk